Wednesday, 25 February 2015

A Murder of Magpies - Judith Flanders

It’s just another day at the office for book editor Samantha Clair. Checking jacket copy for howlers, wondering how to break it to her star novelist that her latest effort is utterly unpublishable, lunch scheduled with gossipy author Kit Lowell, whose new book will deliciously dish the dirt on the fashion industry. But little does she know how much trouble Kit’s book is about to cause. Before it even goes to print. When police inspector Field turns up at the venerable offices of Timmins & Ross, asking questions about an undelivered package that was addressed to Sam, she knows something is wrong. The messenger sent to deliver the package was murdered, and then Kit goes missing. Suddenly, Sam's nine-to-five life is turned upside down and she is propelled into a criminal investigation. Someone doesn't want Kit's scandalous manuscript published and unless Sam can put the pieces together in time, they'll do anything to stop it.

This is the first novel from Judith Flanders. I loved the great insight she provides into an otherwise largely unknown (for me) world of publishing. It’s so detailed because as I later found out she has a background in publishing, and so I now do feel that I gained some insight and not just what someone thinks happens.  I really enjoyed this aspect of the book along with the main character she has created, who I really grew to like, so much so that I would love her as a friend if she existed in real life.

Although the book is in essence a whodunit/murder mystery it is in my opinion a great story told very well. There’s also a little romance thrown in and a Mother who always knows best -  and can prove it being a lawyer.


There are a few side stories running also around the publishing theme and authors and I found this aspect particularly interesting.

A great read if you like a mystery with a twist and can identify with a 40 something would be lady sleuth. I'll certainly be looking out for more fiction by this author.

My thanks to NetGalley and St Martins Press for supplying me with an advance e-copy of this book to review.

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