Friday, 23 August 2019

The Secret Cove in Croatia



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Monday, 19 August 2019

The Most Difficult Thing - Charlotte Philby



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Friday, 16 August 2019

The Perfect Wife - J P Delaney



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Wednesday, 14 August 2019

Seven Days of Us - Francesca Hornak



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Friday, 2 August 2019

Queenie - Candice Carty-Williams




Description

Queenie Jenkins can't cut a break. Well, apart from one from her long-term boyfriend, Tom. That's definitely just a break, though. Definitely not a breakup. 
Stuck between a boss who doesn't seem to see her and a family who don't seem to listen (if it's not Jesus or water rates, they're not interested) and trying to fit in two worlds that don't really understand her, it's no wonder she's struggling.
She was named to be queen of everything. So why is she finding it so hard to rule her own life?
A darkly comic and bitingly subversive take on modern life, Queenie will have you nodding in recognition, crying in solidarity and rooting for this unforgettable character every step of the way.
Perfect for fans of Dolly Alderton, Bryony Gordon and Dawn O'Porter and anyone who loved Fleabag and Dear White People.

Review

I opted for the audio book for this one - what a fantastic reader. Just loved the accents and the patois which I fear would not have sounded one tenth as good in my own head!

In my opinion this is a novel for our time. It's being compared to Bridget Jones, but I would go out on a limb and say it compares slightly more to Saturday Night and Sunday Morning by Alan Sillitoe for it's cultural significance and zeitgeist.

Queenie is a 25 year old black woman who has recently split from her white boyfriend leading her down a promiscuous path of one night stands. (you will need to be a little broad minded). A miscarriage, a career she is in danger of loosing and continually picking the wrong type of "guy" make her a vulnerable character. Her support group of friends has a group chat called "the Corgis" - just hilarious. Her friend Kyazike telling the rest of the uneducated group to refer to the urban dictionary to understand what she is saying.

This story had me entranced and at times yelling advice whilst cringing for Queenie as life slings everything it has at her. Until she at last she finds her voice.

This was from my own personal shelf. I'm giving this book five out of five stars.

Wednesday, 24 July 2019

Everything We Left Behind - Kerry Lonsdale



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Tuesday, 23 July 2019

I am I am I am - Maggie O'Farrell


I Am, I Am, I Am: Seventeen Brushes With Death: The Breathtaking Number One Bestseller by [O'Farrell, Maggie]


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I AM, I AM, I AM is a memoir with a difference - the unputdownable story of an extraordinary woman's life in near-death experiences. Insightful, inspirational, gorgeously written, it is a book to be read at a sitting, a story you finish newly conscious of life's fragility, determined to make every heartbeat count.
A childhood illness she was not expected to survive. A teenage yearning to escape that nearly ended in disaster. A terrifying encounter on a remote path. A mismanaged labour in an understaffed hospital. Shocking, electric, unforgettable, this is the extraordinary memoir from Costa Novel-Award winner and Sunday Times bestselling author Maggie O'Farrell. It is a book to make you question yourself. What would you do if your life was in danger, and what would you stand to lose?


Review

I decided to get the audio version of this book, as I have so many books to read already. I'm so glad I did, as the lady reading the book has the most lovely annunciation and the way she reads just brought it to life, more than if I had read it from the pages myself. I've never read any of O'Farrell's fiction, and only wanted to read this as someone had described part of it to me, and I just knew I wanted to read it. I now want to read her fiction too.

The seventeen chapters are all about brushes with death that the author has experienced. They are set within other anecdotes and that brings them to life as well a softening some of them. Others are very raw - especially the one about her daughter at the end. O'Farrell could have moaned about so many of the things that happened in her life, especially the many times it seems the health professionals let her down. Instead she poured it onto the page and it doesn't come across as a moan but as a rich open wound for others to experience and learn from.

This was a title from my personal shelf.